Nursing with Dr. Hobbick

Nursing Today with Dr. Hobbick on the Wisdom App

February 10, 2022 Dr. Stacey Hobbick Season 1 Episode 10
Nursing with Dr. Hobbick
Nursing Today with Dr. Hobbick on the Wisdom App
Show Notes Transcript

I was introduced to the Wisdom App recently. This app was founded by Dayo Akinrinade and according to their website "Talk LIVE with experts on everything. Be Inspired by Social Audio on the world’s largest mentorship platform." Check it out here and on the Wisdom App. 

Stacey Hobbick:

So here I am today. I guess I'm talking. No, look, it does light up. Okay, cool. So this is Dr. Stacey Hobbick. I have a podcast called nursing with Dr. Hobbick. And I am a passionate nurse educator and a passionate nurse. And I'm just here hanging out today to talk about nursing and any kind of nursing questions that you have sort of hoping that maybe some nursing students will find their way over here, so that I can help them out. That's my favorite thing to do. But if there's a patient or to come on down, let's talk. I'm still figuring out how to use this app. So what kind of questions do you have for a nurse? What kind of questions you have about nursing? Have you ever wanted to be a nurse? You ever wondered how people actually make it through nursing school? That's what I like to do. I like to help people get through nursing school. I like to help patients with health literacy. That's something else that I'm really passionate about making sure that people understand their conditions that they understand their medication regimens, that they understand their options so that they can make informed decisions about their health care. I think that unfortunately, this country hasn't done a very good job of educating people on science and biology and health literacy. We can see that even healthcare workers don't understand some of the laws that surround health care, like HIPAA. There's been a lot of controversy about that one in the news lately about whether or not people can ask you if you're vaccinated, which is not a HIPAA violation. HIPAA only really comes into play when we're talking about a health care system, a health care provider, your insurance provider, I can't go to your health care provider, your doctor and say, Well, is this person vaccinated? That would be a HIPAA violation. But I can ask you, you don't have to tell me but I can ask you. It's not a violation of HIPAA for me to ask you that. Unfortunately, even healthcare workers don't necessarily understand that one. So I'm just hanging out today, trying to figure out how wisdom works. I just got on here, it seems like a really fun app and kind of hoping that somebody wants to listen. So thanks for joining me, those who are here right now, I thought maybe I would just talk about my career path. I actually started nursing when I was in my 20s, I had three children. One of them was just turned a year old, had one who was three and one that was four, if I remember correctly, it seems like a long, long time ago, little kids, I actually had gone through quite a spurt of major postpartum depression after my third child because they were all really close together. I remember seeing a mental health care professional at the time. And she actually told me that there were so many stressors in my life, that she couldn't diagnose me with anything. After I had my kids, and I discovered that in the area I lived, there was no option for a nurse midwife. For those who had Medicaid and in Indiana, and still today, Medicaid will cover nurse midwifery services, but they won't.

Unknown:

They have to be a certified nurse midwife for Medicaid. So there weren't any in my area at the time. And I thought, you know, this is really something that should be available, nurses think differently than doctors do. And traditionally, the gynecologist obstetrician was for complicated pregnancies, pregnancy and birth, while it can have certainly poor outcomes is not an unnatural process. And so even according to the World Health Organization, this country has a much higher rate of C section and interventions. interventions are things that that we do to help that birth along or whatever, then then we really should, and then the research suggests that we should have, and midwives maybe as an answer to that. So I decided to go into nursing. You know, I had big ideas and stars in my eyes and I thought I'm going to go in and I'm going to become a nurse midwife, so that I can help people in my area so I can add this as a service and even then there wasn't a school in Indiana that offered nurse midwifery training there is now but there wasn't at the time. And because I had little kids I decided that I wanted to, you know, I'd go to the community college and I'd go into either the Licensed Practical Nursing Program or the Registered Nursing Program, whichever one I could get in first. I actually ended up getting into the LPN program first, and at the time, I didn't really understand the difference between the two. So I took my prereqs I got into the LPN, I went ahead and started that. And because I knew I wanted to be a nurse midwife, and that required a master's degree, I was already making plans to take my courses that I would need for my bachelor's degree and how I was going to move on from there. I was lucky that in Columbus, Indiana, where I lived at the time, and it's still there. There's an Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana, which is where I got my LPN and my associate's degree of nursing, which gives me my ability to sit for the RN, the registered nursing license. And it sits right next to a joint venture between Indiana University and Purdue University called IUPUI or IUP. You see that one is in Columbus, it's called Indiana University, Purdue University, Columbus. And they offered a very easy pathway to go from Ivy Tech's associates to Indiana University's bachelor's degree. And, you know, it took me a little while I kind of took the long way because of the kids and everything. But I did get through my bachelor's degree. And at that point, my mom actually got sick, they lived in the Carolinas and I was living in Indiana with my three kids. And mom got sick with cancer. So I decided that I was going to move and I knew I wanted to go to school to get my nurse practitioner, nurse midwife, but there was no way you could do that and move at the same time, I couldn't keep residency, it was going to cost me a lot of money. So I decided to go to an online school actually went to Western Governors University and got their master's degree in nursing education is a fantastic degree. I definitely recommend the school I think they have the they're not paying me to say this, but I think they have the the key to adult education because it's competency based, and you get a mentor who helps you through the school. They stick with you through your program. And after I got after I finally finished that degree, I decided I needed to use this master's of nursing education like in a kid can't just get a degree and not use it. Then my full time job certainly didn't require that degree. I was working as a nurse in a doctor's office, I had a really good time in ambulatory care. That's what we call it ambulatory means walking. And I had a really good time there. Because I really enjoyed developing a relationship with my patients, I really enjoyed the ability to say, or to know that that our patients, the doctors in my patients would say, well just send it to Stacey, she'll take care of it. I really liked that I really liked developing that relationship with them. So I stayed in that position. But I went ahead and went looking for a position in a nursing school, I actually found a nice position in a Nurse Aide program. And I started teaching there nights. And it was like a light went off. It was amazing. I loved teaching, I'd found I love nursing, and now I love teaching as well. It was fantastic. So I continued to do that for a while and I was lucky enough to get a full time position at a nursing school I taught in their practical nursing program I taught in there sort of in alignment with the associate's degree program. After that, I continued to work in telephone triage and nursing and telephone triage is, you know, when you call your doctor's office after hours around the weekend, and you end up talking to a nurse Well, that's what I was doing. And I enjoyed that as well. You know, you didn't really build a relationship with the patients, but you did for a little bit, you know, and you knew that you were making a difference, because, you know, maybe I could give some advice to first time parents who are worried about a fever and let them know, Hey, it's okay. Kids get fevers. Or maybe I was telling someone I need you to hang up with me and call 911 and I knew that I was making a difference in people's lives. And sometimes there was a little difference and sometimes that was a big one. But I really enjoyed that. After that, I decided because my mom she had cancer. She had endometrial cancer, and she ended up being re diagnosed it reoccurred and, you know, I kind of thought she's always wanted to live in Florida. Who knows how long she's got left. So I went looking for a position in Florida and we moved down here I work for a university now and I really enjoy that but I also still work at the hospital because again, I don't want to get my foot out of that door. I just love taking care of my patients. I go every weekend I work at on a medical surgical floor which is what you would think about as a normal hospital position for a nurse. I deal with all kinds of different patients but I have such a good time. I love taking care of pain. I love helping people, I love knowing that I've made a difference. And my biggest thing as a nurse and as a nursing instructor is to make sure that my students know that it's always treat the patient first, you know, it's not, it's not about what their, what their condition is, it's about how they're responding to it. When we say that nursing is an art and a science, that's really what we're talking about, we're talking about that, that piece, that caring piece, you know, it's, I want my patients, no matter how busy we are, no matter how COVID has impacted the hospital, I never want them to think that I don't have time to listen to them, I never want them. I want them to feel like rather than they're my only patient, you know, so I always try to take my time. And let them know that, you know, I'm there for them. And I try to listen to what they have to say. And as I mentioned earlier, it's really important to me that they understand what is going on with them, right, I want them to know what is happening, I always try to break things down. I remember a couple of times where I've had interactions with folks, you know, over the phone or wherever, and I give them a small take an extra five minutes and give a small little piece of education, maybe somebody who's got high blood pressure. And I talked to them about sodium and how to read the sodium labels. And the fact that a lot of the food that we eat has a lot of salt in it. And there is a connection between high blood pressure and salt intake. And in this country, you know, we eat a lot of salt, especially in our foods and older, older folks who are maybe on a tight budget, and they're buying pre pre packaged foods. There's a lot of salt in there. I remember one lady, she bless her, she was so sweet. And I took the time to talk to her about that. And she said, No, I don't remember exactly how many years but she had been hypertensive. In other words, she had high blood pressure for years. And she said, nobody's ever had this discussion with me. And I always tell that story to my students, because I always think about how many health care providers let her down on the way through. And I don't know that it's because, you know, they didn't think about it, or they didn't have time. I think a lot of times we take for granted that people understand things. And I know that one of the biggest things that I got out of nursing school was, was really how much I didn't know, before I went to nursing school, how much I didn't know about my own health, about other people's health. The other thing I got was really kind of an understanding of how much we actually don't know about the human body and how it works in medicine. I mean, there isn't really any time where you can say, well, we're just going to totally cure all these things. You look at resistant organisms, bacteria is becoming resistant. I mean, just look at this COVID thing, right? I don't want to talk about coding too much. I don't want to get political, but just thinking about this and thinking about how it works. I mean, I'm not an epidemiologist, but we can see that it's mutating as it goes. And you know, things like Staphylococcus aureus if you've ever heard of Mersa what that means Mersa MRSA is methicillin resistant, Staphylococcus aureus. And most of the literature agrees that the reason that we have these things partially is because, you know, people get their antibiotics, and they don't take them all. They think, well, I feel better, I don't have to keep taking them. Or, you know, I'm not afraid to admit, it's really hard for me to remember to take those pills. And I know better, right? I have all this education. So I don't know, just making sure that everybody understands what's going on. I think it's really important. And, you know, I like to make sure that my students understand things really well, too. So, so that's me in a nutshell. I'm just hanging out here. I'm trying to poke my buttons and see if there's a way that I can ask people to join me, but I haven't figured that one out yet. So sorry guys who are hanging out there listening to me babble today. I have this little sleeping cat, but it doesn't seem to let me invite anyone in. So anyway, I hope that you're all having a good day. Today I am working on lectures. For some medications. I'm actually teaching pharmacology this session. And I'm teaching a class called chronic, who kind of talk about chronic medical conditions, but really just kind of diseases that we see in patients. I'll be talking about electrolyte imbalances next week for my chronic students and talking about Anticholinergics and cholinergic medications for pharmacology. So that's what I'm working on today. I like to include the content for the students actually, that's why I started my podcast and that's how I found wisdom. Somebody sent me an email and told me to clean my podcast here. I started the podcast nursing with Dr. Hobbick, so that the students could have another place to go get their information for class. And so the podcast episodes are actually just my courses, my lectures, shrunk down so that they would be less than 15 or so minutes. My last one fluid balance was 22. But that's because it's a pretty complex topic. So we're working on electrolytes for the students. So that, you know, well, anybody who listens can kind of get an idea. I try to make it easy for anybody to understand not just the nursing students who've had anatomy and physiology and biology, I want everybody to be able to understand this. I think that everyone could make better decisions about their lives and their health if they understood. I mean, it's easy for everybody to say, okay, yes, smoking is associated with cancer. But I remember somebody that I knew who, who, who was a smoker, and who ended up with bladder cancer, and she was surprised that smoking was associated with bladder cancer. I remember the day that she came up to me, she's like, did you know that? And I think, like I said, I think that this country doesn't do a really good job at teaching health literacy to people. The American Medical Association, it's kind of an old video, but they put together a video on health literacy. And there's, you can search it on YouTube, American Medical Association, health literacy. And in that video, there are some folks who just blow me away, I always show it to my students, because I want them to know that we should never assume that people know things, we should always start down here in the conversation, and let them tell us if they already know that, because in that video, you know, there's some folks, there's, there's one guy who I think it's a nurse practitioner, or a physician who's asking him what he thinks about hypertension. Hypertension is a term that we use for high blood pressure. And he says, hyper, like hyperactive, that's what he thinks about. So however long she had been treating him for hypertension, he didn't know that that was the condition that he had that that was the word for it. And another one, excuse me, is a lady who talks about, she's got medication labels, and it says to ticket twice a day, but it doesn't say, you know, one in the morning, or one in the evening, or one in the morning or one in the afternoon. So in the video, she says she just takes two in the morning, so that she knows she's had on for the day. And that's the kind of stuff that I try to tell my students like, you just can't assume that people know what it means we can take it for granted. I mean, this is true in any any field. But you know, we're talking about health and medicine, we're talking about people's bodies and their lives. So we need to be really cautious about how we educate our patients. So that's one reason why I thought I would start the podcast and I thought I would get on here and chat. Maybe eventually I'll figure out how to open this for guests. So I'm sorry, I can't figure that out right now. I'll play with it later. It looks like I actually got folks listening. Thanks for coming on and listening to me babble. Today, I'm just sitting here working on lectures. My name is Dr. Stacey Hobbick. And I'm a nurse educator, I have a Doctorate of Nursing Practice, that doesn't mean I'm a nurse practitioner, my DNP is in educational leadership, because it's one of my passions. And I still work on the floor as a nurse about once once a week, just because I love it so much. And I'm really passionate about nursing and taking care of folks. And I know that that every hospital in the area can use a nurse right now. So you know, keeping myself out there. And it also keeps me up to date on what's going on in healthcare. And I can talk to my students about what is actually happening in the local hospitals and what policies they're going to see out there. And what what kind of patients we're seeing, and it always gives me stories to bring back to my students so that I can, you know, tell them what it's really like, or tell them why this week, I talked to them about fluid balance in the body. And it gives me a chance to say, you know, I took care of a patient this weekend that this information applies to, and you know, an adult education, that's the best thing you can do make this information, tell me how this is relevant. Why do I need to know this? I'm sure everybody who's listening can remember a time when they went, Okay, I'm going to learn this, and I'm never going to use it. But yeah, at least in nursing school that I teach, there's nothing that you won't ever use. There's always stuff that you'll need. And so I always try to give them some stories so that they can know how, how or why it's relevant, why it's important for us to you know, be careful about medications that we check them often that we look at the medicine in our hands that we think about it critically, is this medicine appropriate for this patient so that we don't make a medication error. If for those listening, if you haven't read the Institute of Medicines report called To err is human. You should look it up and read it and that is, I believe 10 years old this year or more. And that was really when the public came on. Hey, somebody wants to talk to me. Cool. I think I said it was okay. Oh, well. I guess I missed it. Anyway, Oh, hey,

Daniel F. Harb:

hey Stacy, how are you?

Unknown:

I'm good. You're my first person to talk with. Oh, yay.

Daniel F. Harb:

Congratulation graduations? Yeah, either. Well, I haven't thrown scrubs on for about a year and a half or so since I founded my, my California LLC. I own a real estate investment company. But even so I'll never let my license go. My licenses and CT, diagnostic radiology X ray. And I just want to say, You know what, God bless you. This world needs our nurses. Some nurses have worked, but not most. They're basically they're, they're angels with wings, you know, they had their wings underneath their blues or whatever color scrubs you're wearing. I mean, I've spoken with nurses that with tears in their eyes, they say, This is my calling. This is my calling and taking good care of people and help people heal. And nurses are amazing.

Unknown:

Thank you. I think that most nurses are, you know, exactly like you said, we we really feel called to it. That's one of the reasons that even though I'm full time educator, I still work on the floor, just because that's my jam. You know, I love to help people. So that's so wonderful. I remember one nurse in the ER, she honestly she was an angel from heaven. She worked so hard, and people adored her. And she actually got this plaque up on the wall for her but she was a little bit embarrassed. She's like, don't don't do that. But she loved your patients so much a homeless man came in. And obviously the feet were completely filthy, you know, overgrown, and just, I mean, in honestly nasty feet. But she took the time to, to wash his feet to bathe his feet to take good care of them, and just, you know, clip the nails and so on. So much. So it's I mean, she's the lady faith. So it's, of course, I'm going to wash this person's feet. You know what I mean? Yeah. Wonderful, wonderful nurses. So kudos to you for being up here. That's awesome.

Stacey Hobbick:

Hey, thank you so much. I appreciate it.

Unknown:

Sure, sure. Good luck to you. And are you fairly new here to wisdom? Yeah, this is my first time having a talk on here. So wow, awesome. You love it here. The the founder Daya akonadi. For this is one of her multiple apps he has but this one, and the mission statement for wisdom. The application is democratizing access to mentorship. And you can find mentors across the board here. And it's wonderful. So welcome. Well, thank you. Thank you. This is exactly the kind of thing that I wanted, you know, that I was looking to do. I've created social media across the board trying to reach out to nursing students, not just mine, but anybody you know. Exactly. And you know, I've been here since day one since that Tuesday, October 12, about four months ago or so. And I fell in love with it because there's good here. And honestly, there's there's mentoring, mentoring for anything you can think of, you know, it's it's mind blowing that it there's so much here about life and wellness about, you know, nurses about radiate, you know, radiologists, there's doctors, there's nurses there. There's attorneys, there's surgeons, you know, food and travel, education, technology, and so on love and family. It's huge here. Yeah, fantastic. Yeah, never blabbering from me, but let's hear from you. You know, we love our professors or in our nursing professors, and we love our radiology directors, that people that taught us and, you know, you're blessed because of that, you know, good for you. Well, thank you so much. I think I'm just blessed for being able to work in this field and being able to have the great students that I have, and you know, having this great calling, it's fantastic. That's awesome. So you're, you're another angel with the wings are hiding underneath your scrubs. There. You got those angel wings, Stacey. Thank you. So good luck to you. You're welcome. And we'll see you around here on wisdom. Okay. Yeah, sure. Okay, take care now. You too. Bye. Well, that was that was awesome. Thanks so much for coming on and chatting with me. You know, that just really kind of points out. That's exactly why I've been starting the the social media stuff is because there's a lot of stuff available out there. A lot of it you have to pay for but I don't want to focus on just nursing students. I want all of this education to be available for anybody who wants it. You know, I like I said earlier, I think that health literacy is not something that this country has done a very good job in education, and hopefully, you know, we can make some difference, make some changes in that. I hope that I can start my research going that way. I'm a new new researcher. So hopefully I can get going on finding ways to increase access for students. That's another thing that I've really noticed that a lot of my Students from technical schools, it's been very different. I've moved into a university environment and I have traditional students in seeing the massive difference between those students who are a minority that I took the you know that I was teaching in either a private school or a technical college. And the students in a traditional setting, it's, it's mind blowing the difference between their preparation and at the same time, it just starkly highlights for me what we need to do about education in this country, I am used to educating my students not just on nursing, but on how to study how to manage their time how to successfully read a textbook or take notes. And that's not something I have to do for the students in the university. And so for me, that is just really a call to action, not just for the public understanding their health literacy. But folks, we've got to do something about education. And it really is true that there are huge differences in your abilities. I mean, we all want to think the American dream. But people who are minorities, people who grow up in poor neighborhoods, they are at a disadvantage period. They can't just come to nursing school and be successful. In fact, my doctoral project was based on risk for attrition in nursing students, because I would watch these students that I knew were brilliant, that understood the content that I could talk with, and we could come up with fantastic ways of helping our patients with nursing interventions. But they couldn't take a test. And so they would fail out of the program. I mean, some of these folks had had other degrees. And it's just, I guess, some some things need to change. And we really need to get on this. You know, education needs to become more important in this country. I really hate to think we have this nursing shortage. And we have all of these folks. I mean, if you look at the nursing demographics, you'll flat out see that it is not representative of our population. And that is something that we need to work on. Not only is it that we don't have enough nurses of color to be representative, we don't have enough men. Men are a minority in the nursing profession. So I think that that's something that we need to work on. I know plenty of men who are fantastic nurses, I know lots of people of color, who are fantastic nurses. In fact, I can think of a woman who has an LPN license, which means she had one year ish like he, about a year 12 months of education. She's an LPN. Now, she knows more than I have ever known. Because she worked on the floor, she's a person of color, and she worked on the floor. She worked in the ICU at a local little rural hospital. But I would always tell my students would come in and I'd say, you see her, you do whatever she says, she knows more than I've ever known. She's forgotten more than I've ever known. And I think part of the problem is that public education does not prepare people, some public education doesn't prepare them, you know, if they're first time college students, their family doesn't know how to support them the right way. And I really think that it behooves us in college in college, who were those of us who work with colleges, to make it more accessible to find those things that are barriers for people and help. That was why it was so important to me, I would always make sure that I was accessible to my students. I know people, I hear a lot of instructors, a lot of professors, they say things like, Well, I'm not going to be available 24/7 I need some kind of a, a line to draw. But you know what, I knew that my students, not the traditional students, but the ones before when I worked in private schools, or in technical colleges, those folks, they had kids, they had jobs, they had about, you know, an hour to study or to do whatever it was that they needed to do for my class to understand the content. And I always told them, I I want to be available. I understand because when I went to nursing school, I had three kids, you have this much time I hold my fingers up little tiny bit of time to get your stuff done. And you're looking at something and trying to understand a concept and you send me an email asking about it and if I don't answer it, so you send it to me on Friday night and I don't answer you till Monday. Well, you've already lost all your time to study it doesn't do any good for me to answer you then so always try to answer my students. I tell them you know, I know how to turn my phone on Do Not Disturb you can text me you can email me whenever. I don't think that that's stepping over the line from nurse to A colleague, you know, not not fraternizing or anything like that. I think it's being available for my students. This is a different age. This is a new age, where information is available and some information is not correct. So I always want my students to know that, you know, that's what you're paying me for. That's what you're here in school, and you're paying me to be an expert for you. You're paying me to facilitate your education. And I want to be available when you need me to be, I want to help you make your little bit of time you have to spend on that education. feasible, realistic. I don't know what word I'm looking for, I guess, most efficient. So I try to be available. Obviously, I'm not going to answer a message if I'm asleep. And I always tell him that, but I'll answer him first thing in the morning. And of course, since I work on the floor, I try to warn him, I'm working on the floor on Sunday, I'm not going to be able to answer your messages during that time. And it's funny, you know, all these instructors and professors that I've ever worked with, and they're always like, well, students email me all the time at inappropriate times. You know what, my students never take advantage of it. I've been doing this for 10 years now. And I've never had students who took it over the line who, who were not respectful or who, you know, messaged me too much. In fact, I sometimes have to fight with them. Like guys, I'm available. You don't have to sit there and pull your hair out. The worst thing I could ever think of is a student trying to understand a concept that they're struggling with and pulling their hair out or trying to figure out how to do an assignment or something like that. I never want to think that my students are struggling like that, like, like, you feel like you're pulling your hair out, you need to send me a message so that I can help you. That's what I'm here for. Oh, hey, Emily wants to come talk to me. Oh, it's gonna count down. That's pretty cool. Hey, Emily, how are you?

Emily Mooney:

Hello. Hey, how are you? Emily? I'm good. Hey, I'm driving right now, I hope it's not too noisy. But I had a question for you that I found just as a nurse, nurses during the pandemic that didn't get in person clinicals. And now they're coming to the floor with all these poor nurses that are already in having to basically be mentored right there. With no law enforcement knowledge of what would have been in their clinical?

Unknown:

Yeah, that's a good question. So that's something that obviously is a unique problem to the last couple of years. And the interesting thing is, is that I actually, I don't know if you heard earlier, but I still work on the floor on weekends, I work on a med floor. And I actually have former students that are working with me. And I've been able to see some of those impacts. For the last couple years, we've been teaching fundamentals. So I haven't really had a whole lot of control over the last end of the program. For those listening who don't know, fundamentals, obviously fundamental. It's like one of the first classes you take in nursing school. But these students are these folks that I'm working with, you know, they actually have impressed me, they have been able to come in and pick it up pretty quickly. But also the hospital that I work for has a pretty robust residency program. So I'm going to explain for those who don't know, this is a transition to practice programs. So they come in, and they get to be paired with a single nurse, and they work with that nurse. And that nurse slowly lets them kind of off the leash and mentors them throughout the time. And they actually take extra classes. And I think that you know that Emily has been a problem for a long time, there is a big gap between the end of nursing school and passing NCLEX and being able to practice as a confident nurse. And I think that's one of the reasons that the NCSBN, the National Council, State Boards of Nursing is changing the NCLEX. I don't know if you've heard that, but they're trying to target more clinical reasoning and judgment making. But this is a big problem. These students who haven't had the opportunity to have experiences, and even then, right now we're seeing for schools, we're seeing hospitals that I'm in Florida, in Northeast Florida. So our hospitals have been kind of overrun in the last six months or so. And these students are even if they're being allowed on the floor, the floors are saying things like all of our nurses are travelers. We can't keep your students or Yeah, yeah, because they don't, they don't want the travelers aren't getting paid for that. And they don't know what the policies are. And the other thing is that we have one big hospital system here that has said, okay, the students need to be assigned to one patient. And so now we have students who have one patient for a whole 12 hour shift and they're not allowed to follow the nurses. And I think that's almost more detrimental than if I could have them in a simulation lab, you know, focused learning around some kind of major thing, but what do you think Emily? What do you think is the answer? What do you think we can do in education to help out those folks on the floor? Man, I just think, I think the most important part, no, I went to I went to the University of Michigan. So I got my BSN. And I got all that theory, which was to say, all that, that's not really important. I felt that it was I appreciated my education. But I did most of my learning, after I graduated, you know, cuz you, you're never really put into those dynamic patient care situations until you're really in a good clinical control. concerned me that these four students, I mean, it was always a hard concert to bring into, right, because they always kittens. Now, I'm hoping that well, maybe this pandemic will change that nasty culture, because they really need these new bodies coming in. Yeah, getting the mentoring that they need. And I just, you know, I just worry so much for the public, because it's great resignations, that has gone on efforts of demoralizing, demoralizing injury by the corporations that we work for, I just see that all of these hospital structures are dinosaur ik, and they're interested and they're gonna, they're gonna fall into the entropy that they should, because when the insert is creating the plan of care, put them into I can't believe the public isn't more irate. I actually, there is a whole system overhaul that has to be done here. And I'm hoping that this pandemic will be the, the opportunity that we have, and you know, I 20 years researching clinical drug trials and monitoring those. So when I entered the hospital system, again, to help during the COVID effort, I want to see how broken those nurses already were by working in that you'll see just asking for their own safety needs to be met. Oh, concerns me about the culture of nursing, that they have been so beaten down by the system that they don't have a voice. And so I'm hoping that the new the new people coming in, not needing that old coaster of dissing it's young will be able to help stretch and profit. You know? Yeah, absolutely. I agree. I think I've been saying for a lot of years. So you know, the system needs to be overhauled, but I don't have the answer. I don't know. I don't know what my answer is. I think that that's, you know, one of the big problems, I really, really liked the things that Benjamin Carson had to say about how to fix this way back in the 90s. When I saw him at a conference, they let the nursing students cannot speak and I heard the guy who was tapped out of that doctor who had that integrative Wellness Center in Kentucky that they made the movie about. Yeah. Like to mention that I wrote about it my journal, I want to actually I'm leaving the healthcare system now to do an RN integrative wellness coaching program, because I want to get back to the fundamentals of nursing, which was preventing disease in the first place and not getting hooked on pharmaceutical protect, as you know, yeah. Oh, I know, there was another nurse talk and I knew someone I'm so happy to find you. Hey, this is my first talk. So they found my podcast and sent me an invitation. I was like, Oh, this sounds like a great idea. I love this. Well, you. And thank you for letting me up and I'll let you down. Welcome to Wisdom. It's a great community.

Stacey Hobbick:

Alrighty, thank you so much for coming on. I appreciate it.

Emily Mooney:

Thanks. Take care. You too.

Unknown:

All right. So that was, that was a good chat with Emily. I'm appreciative that she came on, I'll have to follow her so I can catch her and see what she's talking about. But Thanks all for coming in here. I'm just kind of babbling today. Like I said, this is my first time having a talk on wisdom. And so far I've really enjoyed it. I like being able to interact with other people. And you know, Emily's, right. The nurses are pretty burnt out, they're wore down. I can say that the nurses I work with on my floor. There's been a couple of times where we had 24 beds on our floor, and we had three nurses and one of those nurses was our charge nurse and I can't stress to you how unsafe that was I actually had. I don't want to talk about it too much. But you know, we would have patients who were not really medically stable, which isn't the kind of patient that we should have, especially if we have eight patients, charge nurses not available to help you out. If something happens if a code happened, it would be a really bad situation. None of the other patients would really get taken care of and this is something that's come out of this pandemic, but it's not the only thing to come out of the pandemic. I know that I recently overheard somebody that I know was talking about How many patients the nurses were typically assigned? And I think she was saying five years ago on that floor, we were typically assigned maybe four or five patients. And now we regularly get six. And sometimes we get eight depending on how short we are, in fact, a trend I don't know if Emily knows this, but there's a trend now where the nurses are going back to a team, not the nurses, the hospitals are going back to a team nursing model. And they're hiring LPNs. And while we used to have this model, I'm concerned about it not saying LPNs are bad I started as an LPN, LPN are fantastic. And I think that this is something that we could make work. But I think that the hospitals are maybe going about it the wrong way. They're hiring these LPNs, who, because of the way that they've been treated as nurses, because the hospitals have kind of pushed them out for a long time, have never worked in that kind of an environment, they've been in long term care with patients who are, you know, either, well, medically stable anyways, so they haven't really had to manage some of the conditions that we have to deal with or watch for on in the hospital. And I feel like they're just saying, Okay, well come on down, you, we'll just put you on the floor. But they don't, they don't have that that experience, they don't have that knowledge. And I really think that they should be doing, you know, like a residency program like they do for the brand, the new graduates. Now, I can't say for sure. I don't know exactly what all they're doing. I know, I did work for a hospital locally that was using that kind of model. And it was chaotic. It was it actually made me question whether or not I could still do floor nursing. So, you know, folks are listening. Emily's totally right, we do need to overhaul the system, the way that it's working right now is just not sustainable. I don't know how long it can last if this. You know, it was stressful long before. Most people in the country, at least I think have heard that there's a nursing shortage. Part of the reason there's a nursing shortage is because there's a shortage of faculty. And one of the reasons there's a shortage of faculty is because I make the same amount working on the floor as a nurse where I only had to have a bachelor's degree at most, as I do teaching students where I have to have a doctorate. And I have several certifications. You know, that's not really a good model. If you do want people to spend 1000s of dollars on education to come and educate for you, when I could still make the same amount. And you know, I could work a couple extra days and make overtime, I could probably make more working on the floor than I do as an educator. And so we've got this shortage of educators because they're not valued, they're not paid well. And we could, frankly, make more money educating in the hospital or, you know, doing something else. So that drives into the nursing shortage. We've got this shortage of nurses. And part of the reason is because people come into it, and they say, holy moly, this is not okay. And they leave. In fact, we have not only all these new new folks that go through nursing school, they graduate, and they just leave the bedside completely during their first year, they don't stay. And we have this mass exodus in the last at least year, maybe two years of nurses leaving the floor and going not just into another nursing position, but leaving it completely. I think Emily said she's leaving the bedside to do something else. It sounds like she's doing health care, but she's not working as a nurse with patients in the hospital. You know, this is something that has become common, I think I've seen some places call it a hemorrhage hospitals are hemorrhaging nurses. And you know, I'm a little concerned about what's going on with capping pays. I'm not sure how y'all feel about that. But I'm a little concerned about you know, capping even if they're talking about capping what the my brains not working right now, what the organizations can charge the hospitals for the nurses to travel nurses, you know, that's not going to affect those folks are higher up that's going to get passed on to the nurses and nurses are leaving to go travel because I'll tell you this, if I was making $40 an hour as a nurse, on a weekend shift, the travelers making 100 So why why would I stay when all that I'm getting from my hospital is you know, treated poorly and put in unsafe situations, take care of my patients. When I could go work as a traveler in the same conditions but make a lot more money. So you can see that this is really something that does need to be overhauled the whole system. I don't know I just I feel like there's a lot of things wrong and I don't have the right answer for any of it. I don't have the right answer for insurance and health care. I don't have the right answer for fixing education in the country. I don't Have the right answer for, you know, making tuition more affordable, but making sure that we can hire good professionals to educate our students. I don't I don't have the answers, you know, but I do my best. I try to educate my students and make sure that they take good care of their patients as best they can. And like I said earlier, I always try to make sure that my patients feel like they're my only patient, you know, like, they're my only patient, I never want them to feel like, like, I'm rushed. I don't want them to think that. So I always take my time with them. And sometimes it's because you know, they need it. Sometimes I'm there just to listen, and that's okay. I'm just really passionate about it. And, you know, I wish, I wish we could fix it. I wish I had the magic wand that can fix everything and make nursing perfect. But it's right. We're losing nurses. And there's a lot of things that we need to do about that. Hey, somebody else wants to come talk to me. Dr. Rao. Come on down. I think it has to do a countdown thing real quick.

Dr. Rao:

Hello, stay there. How are you? Oh. Can you hear me?

Stacey Hobbick:

I'm not hearing you. Hold on. Connected. Hey, Dr. Brown, how are you?

Dr. Rao:

I'm good. How are you?

Unknown:

I am wonderful. It's good to see some other professionals on here. And are you a healthcare professional? Or?

Dr. Rao:

Yeah, I'm a physician. Ah, so

Stacey Hobbick:

how are you today?

Unknown:

I'm good. I'm good. So you are a nurse? Yeah. I know the field. Yeah, I find them very stressed out and burned out, to sympathize with them and grapple with them when they're working all the time. So I relied on participation so that I think we need the of the old time back now very, very much the patient that it might. If I wanted to know about the patient, kabocha was going on? I looked at the nice. Yeah, exactly. I don't understand are the fields have become products? Now production? arrangement, no recognitions. But then a reminder. Really give us the enjoy. Right. Yeah. I just want to meet you and say hi. Thank you. Too much. Yeah. So there's, there's shortage of family, family physicians in this country. And, you know, and it's, for the same reasons, you know, I don't know if the folks listening know, but the physicians in the hospital, they're taking care so many patients, and that's why that's why you have to ask the nurse because I've got six or eight patients, but you've got, I don't even know how many, so many more, right. So the time this brand is a lot more than the physician, you know, the clinic apart but in the hospital when it comes, there are only so much time to finish that the patient breezing through relying on information from everybody else. Sorry, they can see a lot more from the office. But then, before I saw when I practiced with paper charts, and we really wanted to interview I did some I did work with a physician in primary care for a while and I think even there though he was pushed too far. You know, they just kept he wasn't his own practice. He worked for a big healthcare system and and we just would see so many patients and he was such a great physician because if one of his patients called and said they were sick, you'd say okay, we'll tell him to come up and we'll squeeze him in. But you know, then we'd end up with we'd be behind and patients are angry and it's like, well, he's taken the same time with his patients that he will with you. But I you know, I would see him working late I'd leave and he's still there. I get there and he's already there, you know, working way more than I ever did. That's for sure. was much easier to follow them for hours that consider this hospital system. kind of broke that. Yeah, yeah. Yeah, it's like I said, I don't know what the fix is. No, I talked about the self resilience that all the health workers develop. And that means give yourself at least a I've talked about comprehensive. I think we need it, we deserve it. Yeah, absolutely. And also bring the release attitude back, you know, we are basically most of the doctors nurses enroll, because they also so that kind of thing also helps us or why those two things. I myself track, then it brings me back to all comments. eat when you're hungry, and empty your mind? No. And exercise optimally. These are the things I kind of choose. And then when we do that, at least, what five minutes a day we can spare for ourselves. Yeah. Now, we'll be sent earlier, I believe. Well, nice talking to you. I just wanted to say hello to another healthcare professional. So I came up. Well, thank you. I appreciate it so much. Dr. Rowe. Yeah. Okay. This is a fantastic app, I think I've already met three people. So today's my first day, doing a live talk here on wisdom. And, gosh, I'm so surprised. There's so many people who are here with me. Now I'm just here babbling about nursing. So hey, thanks for all being here. And I appreciate it. And I hope it's okay for me to say if you want to check out my podcast, it's nursing with Dr. Hobbick, where I just really talk about the concepts that I'm teaching my students right now, every week that I add to it. That's actually what I taught my students in lecture that week, just kind of shortened to try to keep them less than 15 or 20 minutes. And anyway, it's pretty fun. I've got to go. I gotta work on lecture for next week. But I appreciate everybody who's been listening to me babble. And I'm looking forward to having another one of these talks and seeing who I can chat with. And anyway, thanks for coming out today. And I hope you all have a wonderful day, and I'll see you next time.